My Twelve Minute Brain

Short-Attention-Span-Brain-by-Steph-AbbottEach day, I follow a certain schedule. Change is infrequent, but I am flexible and only to a point. My patience has limits.

In fact, there is a specific window of time before my patience has met its limit—twelve minutes.

Twelve minutes is about as long as I can wait for just about anything:

  • Waiting to be seen by a doctor
  • A cup of coffee
  • A pot of spaghetti
  • A batch of cookies
  • A movie’s exposition
  • Crying
  • Complaining
  • Folding laundry
  • Searching for the other sock
  • Internet searches
  • Doodling
  • Planning for times when an activity will take longer than 12 minutes

Of course, this is not an exhaustive list of all the things for which I might wait minutes. It just reflects the amount of time I can stay focused to write this blog post.

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©2014 Stephanie Abbott. All rights reserved.
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Sunday, November 16, 2014. I wrote “My Twelve Minute Brain” this morning. I followed a writing prompt from Daily Prompt, “Waiting Room”: “’Good things come to those who wait.’ Do you agree? How long is it reasonable to wait for something you really want?” As my patience was about up, I created the image, “Short Attention Span Brain” based on a pencil sketch of a brain done by my son for his own short story, “The Land of Knowledge.” I created this doodle using ArtRage 4 on my laptop.

Ode to an Early Winter

20141109-195839.jpgShhh! Here it comes
Leaves rattling, timbers yawning
Temperamental sentries
Shrugged, ready to listen
As whispers get louder

Ooh! Did you feel that?
Flakes landing here atop
Hills braced for impact
Bearded, ready for slumber
As shoulders get shrouded

Brrr! Are you ready?
Grounds shivering, warmth waning
Time waits but not really
As winter arrives, early

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©2014 Stephanie Abbott. All rights reserved.
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Tuesday, November 1, 2014. I wrote the “Ode to an Early Winter” this morning after cooking pancakes for the family. I was inspired by a prompt from a friend who noticed my doodle, “Early Winter.” Yesterday I had a vision, today I have the words. My mind works like that sometimes.

P.S. I’m not sure that it’s long enough to be an ode, but it’s long enough for me. Ha!