Engaging Stories and Authors to Binge On

If you have seen my work, then you know that I am easily entertained. I create doodles, write short stories, or share personal thoughts via haiku. I tend to indulge in popular literature and culture be it written, spoken, filmed, or painted.

When I read, I love the thrilling stories of political intrigue by Vince Flynn or dramas of crime and legal theory by John Lescroart. But I also love reading tragedies in verse by Euripides and Shakespeare.

Whoever the author, I prefer a good yarn that evokes my imagination. Sure it can be filled with eccentric characters and plot twists. But it also has to be passionate and thought provoking

If I find myself truly engaged, then I tend to binge. I might try to consume all of their works. (I can honestly recommend the curated tome, “The Complete Works of Oscar Wilde: Stories, Plays, Poems & Essays.”)

Typically, my binging does not start with their bestseller but with their first story. I like to travel with the author and his characters. And it may take me a while before I move on to another storyteller. (I felt that a season had passed while following Jack Reacher travel with a moral dignity on his shoulder.)

Whatever the story, and outside of the authors listed above, I prefer a story not to be too long with every bit elucidated. I do not want to hear the author justify his voice.  I prefer a storyteller to evoke imagery and engage the consumer as a participant.

One of my favorite storytellers is the poet Robert Frost. He did not write with any continuity of characters, nor did he seem to build or address a community. But I still love to jump into his well of work. Here are just a few of his stories to consider:

  • A popular piece about an alternative reality in “The a Road Not Taken
  • A nod at the end through “Fire and Ice
  • A story of an armchair traveler listening to “The Sound of Trees
  • A tale of the growth of communications via the telegraph in “The Line-Gang
  • Or (one of my favorites) the struggle with morality and reason in the “Quandary

Do you have a favorite storyteller? If so, then who is it?

###

©2014 Stephanie Abbott. All rights reserved.
____________
Sunday, November 23, 2014. My post today was inspired by the prompt “Spinning Yarns” from the folks at Daily Prompt.

 

Flower Pins to My Heart

Side View of A Bunch of Enameled Flower Pins
A Bunch of Enameled Flower Pins

Prickly posies
Poked bunches painted—Ouch!
To stick my heart

A Bunch of Enameled Flower Pins
A Bunch of Enameled Flower Pins

###

©2014 Stephanie Abbott. All rights reserved.
____________
Friday, November 14, 2014. I wrote the haiku“Flower Pins to My Heart” just this evening after a crazy-busy week filled with all those crazy-working-mommy tasks. I found myself gazing at this shadow box. Hand-made by a dear friend, it is filled with enameled flower pins (or brooches as some ladies might say).

When I look at this bunch of lacquered metal flowers, I remember the many times that we spent combing sidewalk sales and thrift shops in San Francisco looking for some such funky find.

I followed a writing prompt from Daily Prompt, “By Hand”: “What’s the best present you’ve ever received that was handmade by the giver, not store-bought? Tell us what made it so special.”

Ode to an Early Winter

20141109-195839.jpgShhh! Here it comes
Leaves rattling, timbers yawning
Temperamental sentries
Shrugged, ready to listen
As whispers get louder

Ooh! Did you feel that?
Flakes landing here atop
Hills braced for impact
Bearded, ready for slumber
As shoulders get shrouded

Brrr! Are you ready?
Grounds shivering, warmth waning
Time waits but not really
As winter arrives, early

###

©2014 Stephanie Abbott. All rights reserved.
____________
Tuesday, November 1, 2014. I wrote the “Ode to an Early Winter” this morning after cooking pancakes for the family. I was inspired by a prompt from a friend who noticed my doodle, “Early Winter.” Yesterday I had a vision, today I have the words. My mind works like that sometimes.

P.S. I’m not sure that it’s long enough to be an ode, but it’s long enough for me. Ha!